Sep
24
Mon
2018
Book Launch— Curtis Ryan: Jordan and the Arab Uprisings @ Elliott School of International Affairs, Room 505
Sep 24 @ 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM

Curtis Ryan will discuss his new book, Jordan and the Arab Uprisings: Regime Survival and Politics Beyond the State, with POMEPS on Monday, September 24, at the Elliott School for International Affairs, Room 505. This book explains how Jordan weathered the turmoil of the Arab Spring. Crossing divides between state and society, government and opposition, Dr. Ryan analyzes key features of Jordanian politics, including Islamist and leftist opposition parties, youth movements, and other forms of activism, as well as struggles over elections, reform, and identity.

Curtis Ryan is a professor of political science at Appalachian State University in North Carolina. He is the author of Jordan in Transition: From Hussein to Abdullah (2002) and Inter-Arab Alliances: Regime Security and Jordanian Foreign Policy (2009).

Free copies of the book will be available for students

A light lunch will be provided

~ Please RSVP below to attend ~

Oct
2
Tue
2018
Book Launch: Richard Nielsen “Deadly Clerics” @ Elliott School of International Affairs, Linder Family Commons Room 602
Oct 2 @ 12:00 PM – 2:00 PM

Richard Nielsen will discuss his new book, Deadly Clerics: Blocked Ambition and the Paths to Jihad (Cambridge University Press, 2017), with POMEPS on Tuesday, October 2, 2018, at the Elliott School for International Affairs, Linder Family Commons Room 602. This book explores multiple pathways of cleric radicalization and shows that the interplay of academic, religious, and political institutions has influenced the rise of modern jihadism through a mechanism of blocked ambition. The book draws on evidence from various sources, including large-scale statistical analysis of texts and network data obtained from the Internet, case studies of clerics’ lives, and ethnographic participant observations at sites in Cairo, Egypt.

Richard Nielsen is an Associate Professor of Political Science at MIT. In 2017-2019, he is an Andrew Carnegie fellow, and his work has previously been supported by the National Science Foundation, the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies, and the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs.

Free copies of the book will be available for students

A light lunch will be provided

~ Please RSVP below to attend ~

Oct
15
Mon
2018
Book Launch: Janine Clark “Local Politics in Jordan and Morocco” @ Elliott School of International Affairs, Linder Family Commons Room 602
Oct 15 @ 12:00 PM – 2:00 PM

Janine Clark will discuss her new book, Local Politics in Jordan and Morocco: Strategies of Centralization and Decentralization (Columbia University Press, 2018), with POMEPS on Monday, October 15, 2018, at the Elliott School for International Affairs, Linder Family Commons Room 602. This book examines why Morocco decentralized while Jordan did not and evaluates the impact of their divergent paths, ultimately explaining how authoritarian regimes can use decentralization reforms to consolidate power. Based on extensive fieldwork, Local Politics in Jordan and Morocco is an important contribution to Middle East studies and political science that challenges our understanding of authoritarian regimes’ survival strategies and resilience.

Janine Clark is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Guelph. She is the author of Islam, Charity, and Activism: Middle-Class Networks and Social Welfare in Egypt, Jordan, and Yemen (2004) and coeditor of Economic Liberalization, Democratization, and Civil Society in the Developing World (2000).

Free copies of the book will be available for students

A light lunch will be provided

~ Please RSVP below to attend ~

Nov
29
Thu
2018
Book Launch: Mohammad Tabaar “Religious Statecraft: The Politics of Islam in Iran” @ Elliott School of International Affairs, Linder Family Commons Room 505
Nov 29 @ 12:00 PM – 2:00 PM

Mohammad Tabaar will discuss his new book, Religious Statecraft: The Politics of Islam in Iran (Columbia University Press, 2018), with POMEPS on Thursday, November 29, 2018 at the Elliott School of International Affairs, Room 505. This book reevaluates the relationship between religion and political actors in Iran. By examining the politics of Islam, rather than political Islam, it achieves a new understanding of Iranian politics and its ideological contradictions. Based on a micro-level analysis of postrevolutionary Iranian media and recently declassified documents as well as theological journals and political memoirs, Religious Statecraft constructs a new picture of Iranian politics in which power drives Islamist ideology.

Mohammad Ayatollahi Tabaar is an assistant professor at the Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University’s Bush School of Government and Public Service and a fellow at the Baker Institute for Public Policy at Rice University. He has previously taught undergraduate and graduate courses at Georgetown University and George Washington University. He has also been a visiting scholar at George Washington, Cambridge, Harvard and Columbia universities.

Free copies of the book will be available for students

A light lunch will be provided

~ Please RSVP below to attend ~