Mar
4
Mon
2019
Book Launch: Dina Bishara, “Contesting Authoritarianism: Labor Challenges to the State in Egypt” @ Elliott School of International Affairs, Room 505
Mar 4 @ 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM

Dina Bishara will discuss her new book, Contesting Authoritarianism: Labor Challenges to the State in Egypt, with POMEPS on Monday, March 4, 2019 at the Elliot School of International Affairs, Room 505.

In this book, Bishara examines the relationship between labour organizations and the state in Egypt to shed light on how political change occurs within an authoritarian government, and to show how ordinary Egyptians perceive the government’s rule. Moving beyond conventional accounts of top-down control, this book explores when and how institutions designed for political control become contested from below.

Dina Bishara is an assistant professor of political science at the University of Alabama. Her research focuses on state-labor relations, social and protest movements under authoritarian rule, and transitions from authoritarian rule. Prior to joining the Belfer Center, Dina was the Jarvis Doctorow Research Fellow in the Politics and International Relations of the Middle East at the University of Oxford and a Research Fellow at the German Institute for International and Security Affairs. She holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the George Washington University. Dina was an associate at the Belfer Center’s Middle East Initiative and former postdoctoral research fellow (2015-2016).

Free copies of the book will be available for students

A light lunch will be provided

~ Please RSVP below to attend ~

 

Mar
21
Thu
2019
Book Launch: Ariel Ahram, “Break All the Borders” @ Elliott School of International Affairs, Room 505
Mar 21 @ 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM

Ariel I. Ahram will discuss his new book, Break All the Borders (Oxford University Press, 2019), with POMEPS on Thursday, March 21, 2019 at the Elliott School of International Affairs, Room 505. In Break all the Borders, Ariel I. Ahram examines the separatist movements that aimed to remake the borders of the Arab world and create new independent states. With detailed studies of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, the federalists in eastern Libya, the southern resistance in Yemen, and Kurdish nationalist parties, Ahram explains how separatists captured territory and handled the tasks of rebel governance, including managing oil exports, electricity grids, and irrigation networks.

Ariel I. Ahram is Associate Professor in the Virginia Tech School of Public and International Affairs in Alexandria, Virginia, and non-resident fellow at Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy. He earned a Ph.D. in government and M.A. in Arab Studies from Georgetown and B.A., summa cum laude, from Brandeis. He writes widely on security issues in the Middle East and North Africa. He was a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington D.C. and has spoken and lectured at the World Bank, Marine Corps University, and the German Institute for Global Affairs. In 2015, he testified before the U.S. House Foreign Affairs Committee on the Islamic State’s abuses of women and children.

Free copies of the book will be available for students

A light lunch will be provided

~ Please RSVP below to attend ~

Apr
8
Mon
2019
Book Launch: Lisel Hintz, “Identity Politics Inside Out: National Identity Contestation and Foreign Policy in Turkey” @ Elliott School of International Affairs, Room 505
Apr 8 @ 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM

Lisel Hintz will discuss her new book Identity Politics Inside Out: National Identity Contestation and Foreign Policy in Turkey, with POMEPS on Monday, April 8, 2019 at the Elliot School of International Affairs, Room 505.

In this book, Hintz writes about the complex link between identity politics and foreign policy using an in-depth study of Turkey. Rather than treating national identity as cause or consequence of a state’s foreign policy, she repositions foreign policy as an arena in which contestation among competing proposals for national identity takes place.

Dr. Lisel Hintz is an assistant professor at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies. She works at the intersection of identity politics and foreign policy. She is particularly interested in how domestic identity struggles spill over to shape, and be shaped by international affairs. Her regional focus is on Turkey and its relations with Europe and the Middle East. She received her PhD in Political Science from George Washington University, was a Postdoctoral Fellow at Cornell University’s Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies, and was Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at Barnard College, Columbia University.

Free copies of the book will be available for students

A light lunch will be provided

~ Please RSVP below to attend ~

 

Apr
24
Wed
2019
Book Launch: Matt Buehler, “Why Alliances Fail: Islamist and Leftist Coalitions in North Africa” @ Elliott School of International Affairs, Room 505
Apr 24 @ 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM

Matt Buehler will discuss his new book Why Alliances Fail: Islamist and Leftist Coalitions in North Africa, with POMEPS on Wednesday, April 24, 2019 at the Elliot School of International Affairs, Room 505.

Since 2011, the Arab world has seen a number of autocrats, including leaders from Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, and Yemen, fall from power. Yet, in the wake of these political upheavals, only one state, Tunisia, transitioned successfully from authoritarianism to democracy. Opposition parties forged a durable and long-term alliance there, which supported democratization. Similar pacts failed in Morocco and Mauritania, however. In Why Alliances Fail, Buehler explores the circumstances under which stable, enduring alliances are built to contest authoritarian regimes, marshaling evidence from coalitions between North Africa’s Islamists and leftists. Buehler draws on nearly two years of Arabic fieldwork interviews, original statistics, and archival research, including interviews with the first Islamist prime minister in Moroccan history, Abdelilah Benkirane. Introducing a theory of alliance durability, Buehler explains how the nature of an opposition party’s social base shapes the robustness of alliances it builds with other parties. He also examines the social origins of authoritarian regimes, concluding that those regimes that successfully harnessed the social forces of rural isolation and clientelism were most effective at resisting the pressure for democracy that opposition parties exerted. With fresh insight and compelling arguments, Why Alliances Fail carries vital implications for understanding the mechanisms driving authoritarian persistence in the Arab world and beyond.

Matt Buehler is a Global Security Fellow at the Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy and an assistant professor of political science at the University of Tennessee.

Free copies of the book will be available for students

A light lunch will be provided

~ Please RSVP below to attend ~