POMEPS Conversations

#35 — April 16, 2014. The George Washington University’s Marc Lynch, director of the Project on Middle East Political Science, speaks with Sheila Carapico, professor of political science and international studies and coordinator of the international studies program at the University of Richmond. She is the author of Civil Society in Yemen: The Political Economy of activism in Modern Arabia (1998). Lynch and Carapico discuss her recent release Political Aid and Arab Activism: Democracy Promotion, Justice, and Representation as well as Yemen’s National Dialogue Conference and the impacts of U.S. drone strikes on Yemen.

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#34 — February 20, 2014. The George Washington University’s Marc Lynch, director of the Project on Middle East Political Science, speaks with Carrie Rosefsky Wickham, associate professor of political science at Emory University. Wickham’s research focuses on the origins of political opposition in authoritarian settings, particularly the rise of Islamic activism in Egypt and other Arab states. She is the author of Mobilizing Islam: Religion, Activism, and Political Change in Egypt. Lynch and Wickham discuss Islamist movements and Wickham’s recent release The Muslim Brotherhood: Evolution of an Islamist Movement.

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#33 — February 7, 2014. The George Washington University’s Marc Lynch, director of the Project on Middle East Political Science, speaks with François Burgat, senior researcher at CNRS at the Institut de Recherches et d’Etudes sur le Monde Arabe et Musulman (IREMAM) in Aix-en-Provence, France and principal investigator of When Authoritarianism Fails in the Arab World. Burgat’s research focuses on politics in the contemporary Arab world and Islamism with a concentration on Yemen, Saudi Arabia, and Iran. He is the author of Islamism in the Shadow of al Qaeda (2008), Face to Face with Political Islam (2002), and The Islamic Movement in North Africa (1997). Lynch and Burgat discuss the evolution of Islamic Movements and current dynamics in political Islam.

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#32 — January 30, 2014. The George Washington University’s Marc Lynch, director of the Project on Middle East Political Science, speaks with Thomas Hegghammer, director of terrorism research at the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment (FFI). Hegghammer’s research centers on Islamic militancy and transnational terrorist groups. He is the author of Jihad in Saudi Arabia (2010) and co-author of The Meccan Rebellion (2001) and al-Qaida in its Own Words (2008). Lynch and Hegghammer discuss jihadist trends and Syria.

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#31 — December 6, 2013. The George Washington University’s Marc Lynch, director of the Project on Middle East Political Science, speaks with David Faris, assistant professor of Political Science at Roosevelt University where he teaches Egyptian and Middle Eastern Politics. He holds a PhD in Political Science from Pennsylvania University. Lynch and Faris discuss social media, the Egyptian revolution, and Faris’s new book Dissent and Revolution in a Digital Age: Social Media, Blogging and Activism in Egypt.

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#30 — November 22, 2013. The George Washington University’s Marc Lynch, director of the Project on Middle East Political Science, speaks with Ian Lustick, professor of political science and Bess W. Heyman Chair at the University of Pennsylvania. Lustick is a past president of the Politics and History Section of the American Political Science Association and of the Association for Israel Studies, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He is the author of Trapped in the War on Terror (2006), For the Land and the Lord: Jewish Fundamentalism in Israel (1988), Unsettled States, Disputed lands: Britain and Ireland, France and Algeria, Israel and the West Bank-Gaza (1993), and State Building in British Ireland and French Algeria (1985). Lynch and Lustick discuss the Israeli and Palestinian peace process, and Lustick’s recent article “Two-State Illusion.”

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#29 — November 8, 2013. The George Washington University’s Marc Lynch, director of the Project on Middle East Political Science, speaks with Aboubakr Jamaï, Richard von Weizsäcker Fellow with the Robert Bosch Foundation and editor of the French version of Lakome.com. A Moroccan journalist, Jamaï was the publisher of the newspapers Le Journal Hebdomadaire and Assahifa al-Ousbouiya. In 2003, he was awarded the International Press Freedom Award of the Committee to Protect Journalists. Lynch and Jamaï discuss Moroccan media and press freedom.

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#28 – November 1, 2013. The George Washington University’s Marc Lynch, director of the Project on Middle East Political Science, speaks with Toby Matthiesen, research fellow in Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies at Pembroke College, University of Cambridge. Matthiesen has previously worked as a Gulf Consultant for the International Crisis Group. He has published in The New York Review of Books, The Guardian, Foreign Policy, Middle East Journal, and Middle East Report. Lynch and Matthiesen discuss sectarianism, the Arab Uprisings in the Gulf, and Matthiesen’s new book Sectarian Gulf: Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, and the Arab Spring That Wasn’t.

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#27 – October 25, 2013. The George Washington University’s Marc Lynch, director of the Project on Middle East Political Science, speaks with Adria Lawrence, assistant professor of political science at Yale University and research fellow at the MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies, where she studies conflict and collective action. Lynch and Lawrence discuss Moroccan politics and youth protest movements as well as her new book Imperial Rule and the Politics of Nationalism: Anti-Colonial Protest in the French Empire.

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#26 – October 18, 2013. The George Washington University’s Marc Lynch, director of the Project on Middle East Political Science, speaks with John Entelis, professor of political science and director of the Middle East Studies Program at Fordham University. He is the president of the American Institute for Maghrib Studies (AIMS). Entelis is the author or co-author of The Government and Politics of the Middle East and North Africa (1980, 1986, 1995, 2002, 2006, 2011), Culture and Counterculture in Moroccan Politics (1989,1996), State and Society in Algeria (1992), and Islam, Democracy, and the State in North Africa (1997). Lynch and Entelis discuss the uprisings in Tunisia and North Africa as well as historical and current political dynamics.

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