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stacey yadav

This week’s conversation is with Stacey Philbrick Yadav. She speaks with Marc Lynch about the ongoing civil war in Yemen and the difficulty of an enduring resolution. Yadav is the author of Islamists and the State: Legitimacy and Institutions in Yemen and Lebanon  and a frequent contributor to the Monkey Cage.

You can subscribe to POMEPS Conversations podcast on iTunes, follow us on SoundCloud, or listen below:

Yadav is an associate professor of political science at Hobart and William Smith Colleges, specializing in comparative politics of the Middle East. Her research focuses on the role of Islamist organizations in the transformation of public spheres, concentrating on research in Lebanon, Yemen, Egypt, and Israel. She is also a member of the American Institute for Yemeni Studies.

Read more from Yadav:

Yemen’s Houthis and Islamist republicanism under strainThe Monkey Cage (February 2, 2015).

The limits of ‘sectarian’ framing in Yemen. The Monkey Cage (September 25, 2014).

Tawakkul Karman as Cause and Effect. Middle East Report (Fall 2011).

POMEPS Conversation #19 (May 7, 2013).

 

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This week’s conversation is with Lindsay J. Benstead. She speaks with Marc Lynch about who votes for women, and why, in the Middle East. Benstead is noted for her work in survey methodology and public opinion in the Middle East. She’s written about gender quotas in governments, democracy in the Middle East, and Tunisia’s election and female candidates for the Monkey Cage.

You can subscribe to POMEPS Conversations podcast on iTunes, follow us on SoundCloud, or listen below:

Benstead is an assistant professor of political science in the Mark O. Hatfield School of Government at Portland State University, where she teaches courses on Middle East and North African politics and research methods. Her research focuses on identity politics, clientelism, public opinion, and survey methodology in the Middle East and North Africa. She is also a contributing scholar in the Women’s Rights in the Middle East Program at Rice University. She holds a Ph.D. in Public Policy and Political Science and a M.A.E. in Applied Economics from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

Read more from Benstead:

Effects of Interviewer–Respondent Gender Interaction on Attitudes toward Women and Politics: Findings from Morocco. Oxford Journals, Social Sciences International Journal of Public Opinion, Research Volume 26, Issue 3.

Why Quotas Are Needed to Improve Women’s Access to Services in Clientelistic Regimes. Governance (2015).

Does Interviewer Religious Dress Affect Survey Responses? Evidence from Morocco. Politics and Religion, Volume 7, Issue 04, December 2014.

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The George Washington University’s Marc Lynch, director of the Project on Middle East Political Science, with Michael Wahid Hanna & Thanassis Cambanis of The Century Foundation. They talk about the upcoming fifth anniversary of the Egyptian revolution on January 25, and the challenges facing Egypt today.

Cabman’s is the author of Once Upon a Revolution: An Egyptian Story. Hanna’s most recent report is Egypt’s Next Phase, and he is the author of Getting Over Egypt at Foreign Affairs. Hanna wrote Blame Morsi following the coup, which was collected in POMEPS Brief No. 20.

Listen to this POMEPS Conversations podcast below, on iTunesUor on SoundCloud.

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The first episode in the new POMEPS Conversations series features my George Washington University colleague Nathan Brown. Currently the director of GW’s Institute for Middle East Studies, Brown recently concluded a term as the president of the Middle East Studies Association. He is also a member of the POMEPS Advisory Board and my colleague at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace Middle East Program. Brown has been an exceptionally prolific and thoughtful analyst of Egypt and the Arab world and his newest book is When Victory is Not an Option: Islamist Movements in Arab Politics (Cornell University Press). He contributes frequently to the Monkey Cage, including most recently “Why Egypt’s new Parliament will be born broken” (October 13, 2015) and “Who is running the Egyptian state?” (July 31, 2015).

Listen to my conversation with Nathan Brown about Egyptian politics today— you can stream below or download here.

Marc Lynch

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The POMEPS Conversations video series has always been one of my favorite POMEPS activities.  We launched the series in September 2012 with a long conversation with Columbia University’s Timothy Mitchell about his then new book, Carbon Democracy: Political Power in the Age of Oil.

By the third episode, a conversation with Gregory Gause, we had settled into a distinctive format. In each episode, I would talk with a visiting scholar for no more than 15 minutes about anything from a new book, recent research, issues in the headlines, or their career. We recorded 48 episodes in all, ending in May 2015 with a conversation with Temple University’s Sarah Bush about her book Taming Democracy Assistance. This fall we stopped recording conversations because of my research sabbatical.

I am therefore delighted to announce the return of the POMEPS Conversation series as an audio podcast. I will continue to talk with a wide range of political scientists about their research and about current events. I will also talk with the occasional non-political scientist when it seems appropriate. The audio format gives us more flexibility in recording the conversations, especially as POMEPS ventures outside of GW, and will spare viewers my radio-friendly visage. We hope to post a new conversation each week, so be sure to stay tuned for more podcasts.

The first episode in the new POMEPS Conversations series features a familiar voice: my George Washington University colleague Nathan Brown. Currently the director of GW’s Institute for Middle East Studies, Brown recently concluded a term as the president of the Middle East Studies Association. He is also a member of the POMEPS Advisory Board and my colleague at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace Middle East Program. Brown has been an exceptionally prolific and thoughtful analyst of Egypt and the Arab world and his newest book is When Victory is Not an Option: Islamist Movements in Arab Politics (Cornell University Press). He contributes frequently to the Monkey Cage, including most recently “Why Egypt’s new Parliament will be born broken” (October 13, 2015) and “Who is running the Egyptian state?” (July 31, 2015).

Listen to my conversation with Nathan Brown about Egyptian politics today— you can stream below or download here.

Marc Lynch

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On November 5, 2015, Avi Max Spiegel joined POMEPS to discuss his recent release, Young Islam: The New Politics of Religion in Morocco and the Arab World (Princeton University Press 2015).  

Avi Spiegel is an assistant professor of political science and international relations at the University of San Diego and a fellow at the Strauss Center for International Security and Law at The University of Texas at Austin. He is a regular contributor to Foreign Policy and Huffington Post and has appeared as a Middle East analyst on Al Jazeera English, the BBC World Service, and NPR.

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On October 29, 2015, POMEPS hosted a conversation with Jason Brownlee, Tarek Masoud and Andrew Reynolds about their new book The Arab Spring: Pathways of Repression and Reform.

Jason Brownlee is an associate professor of government and Middle Eastern Studies at The University of Texas at Austin, and his research focuses on political violence during periods of political change, with an emphasis on the experiences of vulnerable populations. He is also the author of Democracy Prevention: The Politics of the U.S.-Egyptian Alliance (Cambridge University Press, 2012) and Authoritarianism in an Age of Democratization (Cambridge University Press, 2007).

Tarek Masoud is an associate professor at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, and his research addresses the role of religion in the Muslim world’s political development. He is the author of Counting Islam: Religion, Class, and Elections in Egypt (Cambridge University Press, 2014), and the co-editor of Problems and Methods in the Study of Politics (Cambridge, 2004) and Order, Conflict, and Violence (Cambridge, 2008).

Andrew Reynolds is an associate professor of political science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and his research deals with democratization, constitutional design and electoral politics, with a particular focus on the presence and impact of minorities and marginalized communities. He is also the author of Designing Democracy in a Dangerous World (Oxford, 2011), The Architecture of Democracy: Constitutional Design, Conflict Management, and Democracy (Oxford, 2002) and Electoral Systems and Democratization in Southern Africa (Oxford, 1999).

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Mark Tessler is a Samuel J. Eldersveld Collegiate Professor of political science at the University of Michigan and co-directs the Arab Barometer Survey project.  His research examines the nature, determinants, and political implications of attitudes and values held by ordinary citizens the Middle East and he has written extensively on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

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Toby Matthiesen is a research fellow in Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies at Pembroke College, University of Cambridge. He is the author of Sectarian Gulf: Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, and the Arab Spring That Wasn’t (Stanford University Press, 2013). POMEPS hosted Matthiesen in 2013 to discuss Sectarian Gulf in POMEPS Conversations 28. He discusses his recent release The Other Saudis: Shiism, Dissent and Sectarianism (Cambridge University Press, 2014). Kristin Smith Diwan offers comments. Diwan is a professorial lecturer at American University and a visiting scholar at the George Washington University’s Institute for Middle East Studies.

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#48 — May 7, 2015. The George Washington University’s Marc Lynch, director of the Project on Middle East Political Science, speaks to Sarah Bush, assistant professor of political science at Temple University. She is the author of The Taming of Democracy Assistance: Why Democracy Promotion Does Not Confront Dictators (Cambridge University Press, 2015). Lynch and Bush discuss this new book, which looks at democracy promotion in Jordan and Tunisia.

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