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#37 — September 12, 2014. The George Washington University’s Marc Lynch, director of the Project on Middle East Political Science, speaks with Kaveh Ehsani, assistant professor of international studies at DePaul University. He is the author of the forthcoming book Oil and Society: Abadan and Urban Modernity in 20th Century Iran and co-author of the forthcoming book The New Politics of Post-Revolution Iran. Lynch and Ehsani discuss Iranian politics, the presidencies of Hassan Rouhani and Mohammad Khatami, and Iranian football.

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#36 — September 9, 2014. The George Washington University’s Marc Lynch, director of the Project on Middle East Political Science, speaks with Tarek Masoud, associate professor of public policy at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. He is the co-editor of Problems and Methods in the Study of Politics (2004) and Order, Conflict, and Violence (2008). Lynch and Masoud discuss his recent release Counting Islam: Religion, Class, and Elections in Egypt as well as political Islam and the present state of the Muslim Brotherhood.

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Sheila Carapico is a professor of political science and international studies and coordinator of the international studies program at the University of Richmond. She is the author of Civil Society in Yemen: The Political Economy of activism in Modern Arabia (1998). She discussed her recent release Political Aid and Arab Activism: Democracy Promotion, Justice, and Representation.

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Philip Howard and Muzammil Hussain discuss their recent release Democracy’s Fourth Wave? Digital Media and the Arab Spring. Philip Howard is an associate professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Washington. Howard directs the World Information Access Project and the Project on Information Technology and Political Islam. He is the author of The Digital Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy. He teaches courses on research methods, politics online, and international development. Muzammil M. Hussain is a doctoral candidate at the University of Washington’s department of communication, and comparative international researcher at the Center for Communication and Civic Engagement focusing on information infrastructure and social organization, and digital media and political participation.

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#35 — April 16, 2014. The George Washington University’s Marc Lynch, director of the Project on Middle East Political Science, speaks with Sheila Carapico, professor of political science and international studies and coordinator of the international studies program at the University of Richmond. She is the author of Civil Society in Yemen: The Political Economy of activism in Modern Arabia (1998). Lynch and Carapico discuss her recent release Political Aid and Arab Activism: Democracy Promotion, Justice, and Representation as well as Yemen’s National Dialogue Conference and the impacts of U.S. drone strikes on Yemen.

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Panelists discuss the insurgency in Syria, the organizational problems of the Syrian opposition and how will these challenges shape the conflict moving forward, as well as the mass exodus of refugees to neighboring countries. This event was held on November 8, 2013.

Panelists: 

Steven Heydemann  – United States Institute of Peace

Zachariah Mampilly – Vassar College

Wendy Pearlman – Northwestern University

Jonah Schulhofer-Wohl – University of Virginia 

Moderated by: 

Marc Lynch – George Washington University 

For background information on the situation in Syria, please visit the updated POMEPS Arab Uprisings Bibliography.

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Monica Marks discusses political Islam, youth politics, and the Tunisian constitutions with comments by Dr. William Lawrence.

Monica Marks is a leading expert on contemporary Tunisian politics. Her work, which focuses primarily on Islamism, youth politics, and security reform in Tunisia, has appeared in Foreign PolicyThe New York Times, and the Huffington Post. She is the author of the newly released Brookings report on Tunisia entitled “Convince, Coerce, or Compromise? Ennahda’s Approach to Tunisia’s Constitution.” As lead Tunisia researcher for the Barcelona-based Institute for Integrated Transitions (IFIT), Marks authored “Inside the Transition Bubble,” a report analyzing international technical assistance flows for Tunisia’s transition. Marks is a Tunisia-based Rhodes Scholar and doctoral candidate at St. Antony’s College, Oxford University. Her doctoral dissertation examines internal transition in Tunisia’s Ennahda, focusing on ideological and organizational transformations since the 2011 revolution. She is a recipient of a POMEPS Travel–Research–Engagement grant to support field research on forging pluralism and internal dispute and ideological restructuring in Tunisia’s Ennahda Party.

Dr. William Lawrence is a visiting professor of political science and international affairs at George Washington University and a senior fellow at the Project on Middle East Democracy. [click to continue…]

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Carrie Rosefsky Wickham is an associate professor of political science at Emory University. Wickham’s current research focuses on the origins of political opposition in authoritarian settings, focusing on the rise of Islamic activism in Egypt and other Arab states. She is the author of Mobilizing Islam: Religion, Activism, and Political Change in Egypt. She discussed her recent release The Muslim Brotherhood: Evolution of an Islamist Movement.

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#34 — February 20, 2014. The George Washington University’s Marc Lynch, director of the Project on Middle East Political Science, speaks with Carrie Rosefsky Wickham, associate professor of political science at Emory University. Wickham’s research focuses on the origins of political opposition in authoritarian settings, particularly the rise of Islamic activism in Egypt and other Arab states. She is the author of Mobilizing Islam: Religion, Activism, and Political Change in Egypt. Lynch and Wickham discuss Islamist movements and Wickham’s recent release The Muslim Brotherhood: Evolution of an Islamist Movement.

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#33 — February 7, 2014. The George Washington University’s Marc Lynch, director of the Project on Middle East Political Science, speaks with François Burgat, senior researcher at CNRS at the Institut de Recherches et d’Etudes sur le Monde Arabe et Musulman (IREMAM) in Aix-en-Provence, France and principal investigator of When Authoritarianism Fails in the Arab World. Burgat’s research focuses on politics in the contemporary Arab world and Islamism with a concentration on Yemen, Saudi Arabia, and Iran. He is the author of Islamism in the Shadow of al Qaeda (2008), Face to Face with Political Islam (2002), and The Islamic Movement in North Africa (1997). Lynch and Burgat discuss the evolution of Islamic Movements and current dynamics in political Islam.

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