The upheavals in the Middle East have reopened urgent questions of physical boundaries and national identities. Across the Middle East, insurgencies and civil wars have challenged national frontiers, embattled regimes have sought to redefine national narratives, and Islamist and sectarian movements have taken on new manifestations. Meanwhile, the massive refugee movements triggered by these processes have reconfigured landscapes and generated tension around existing notions of citizenship and identity. On February 6, 2015, a dozen scholars joined a POMEPS and University of Southern California workshop to explore questions related to these challenges to existing configurations of nation and nationalism in the region. The papers for the workshop will be published over the next several weeks here and/or on The Monkey Cage, and then released as a special issue of the POMEPS Studies series

Different faces of Turkish Islamic nationalism,” by Senem Aslan, Bates College

Redefining the Kurdish nation,” by Nicole F. Watts, San Francisco State University

The identity politics of displacement in the Middle East,” by Adam G. Lichtenheld, University of California, Berkeley

Kurds, state elites, and patterns of nationhood in Iraq and Turkey,” by Serhun Al, University of Utah

Whose colonialism? The contested memory of the Sykes-Picot Agreement,” by Meghan Tinsley, Boston University

Lebanon’s national politics in the face of a changing region,” by Christiana Parreira, Stanford University

Iraqi nationalism and the Iran-Iraq War,” Lisa Blaydes, Stanford University

From Jim Crow to ‘Gentlemen’s Agreement:’ The legal and soft barriers to equality and integration of citizen-Palestinians in Israel,” By Gershon Shafir, University of California, San Diego

Turkey’s secularization in reverse?” by Kristin Fabbe, Claremont McKenna College

Islam and Islamists in the 2014 Tunisian elections,” by Elizabeth L. Young, University of Michigan

Remembering failed states in the Middle East,” by David Siddhartha Patel, Brandeis University

Which borders will states fight for?” by Nadav Shelef, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Do Jordan’s tribes challenge or strengthen the state?” by Kristen Kao, UCLA

The Islamic State and the politics of official narratives,” Laurie Brand, University of Southern California

Rethinking Nation and Nationalism Memos

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